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  2. Researchers have found variants of a gene that influence Alzheimer's disease risk through their effect on a cerebrospinal fluid protein. Link naar het originele artikel
  3. I had not heard of an infrared sauna before a practitioner told me about the device. Early in the process of diagnosing my sarcoidosis, it was suggested as a way to help manage joint pain. Luckily, my primary care physician (PCP) has an infrared sauna in his office. For a nominal fee, patients can use the sauna to see if they find it helpful. So I gave it a try. First, I did my own research. I discovered that an infrared sauna, also called a far-infrared sauna, uses light to penetrate tissues and heat the body, while a standard sauna heats the air around it. Potential health benefits of an infrared sauna include joint and muscle pain relief, increased flexibility, better circulation, and an overall sense of well-being. The sauna in my PCP’s office is a two-person unit. It resembles a large closet with windows. To use it, you simply walk into the unit, close the door, and sit on one of several benches during your treatment. While I often experience claustrophobia in contained spaces, I had no problem with this at all. I spent 30 minutes in the sauna, and it was very relaxing. I brought a book to read, which helped pass the time. Although I didn’t feel any different after a single treatment, I started to get some relief from joint pain after a few uses. Overall, I just felt better. Visiting my PCP’s office several times a week, or as needed, wasn’t going to be an option long-term, so my husband and I explored options to buy a unit for home use. The walk-in sauna was definitely out of our price range, but a single-person unit was within reach. We opted for that version. The unit we purchased is a tubelike structure that sits on the floor. When you use it, you slide yourself into one part of the tube and pull the second part of the tube over you. If it sounds a bit cumbersome to use, that’s because it can be. Maneuvering around to get situated in the unit can be challenging. Storage and setup can be difficult, too. The unit is bulky and doesn’t fit anywhere very well. I wind up leaving it fully intact in a room. I can’t easily read in this model. However, I do usually wind up falling asleep during a 15- to 20-minute session. In summer, even if I keep the air conditioning on and drink plenty of water during my treatment, I find it’s just too hot to use the sauna. It works best for me during the colder months. Despite those minor complaints, this infrared sauna did produce the same results as its larger counterpart for me. There is also something to be said for the convenience of using the sauna at home when you need it. I have had my infrared sauna for over 10 years now, and I paid close to $2,000 for it. It was pricey, but I have gotten my money’s worth out of it. Some models have come down in price since my purchase. I know there are now other infrared products on the market — heating pads, collapsible sauna units, even blankets — that are far less expensive than the sauna. I can’t speak to the effectiveness of these products. Although there is limited scientific evidence of the health benefits of far-infrared sauna use, my experience with it has been positive. Numerous health centers now rent sessions so people can give the treatment a try. If you’re interested, speak to your doctor to determine whether it’s a good choice for you. I find that managing sarcoidosis requires utilizing a number of treatment options for the best outcome. Sessions in an infrared sauna are one aspect of my ongoing care plan. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Can an Infrared Sauna Help Minimize Your Sarcoidosis Pain? appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  4. To date, the underlying causes of inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been poorly understood, which has hampered efforts to develop treatments to prevent complications from a disease that is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Link naar het originele artikel
  5. Joachim

    Is endometriosis an autoimmune disease?

    Endometriosis is not an autoimmune disease, but research shows that it may have links to some autoimmune conditions. Learn more about the connection in this article. Link naar het originele artikel
  6. Laatste week
  7. Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) run a greater risk of psychiatric disorders, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in JAMA Pediatrics. The researchers claim that more psychological support and longer follow-up is needed for the children affected and their parents. Link naar het originele artikel
  8. It's well established that chronic inflammation can lead to colon cancer, but the molecular mechanisms behind this association aren't fully understood. Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center into the role that the signaling protein SMAD4 plays in this process has received funding from the National Cancer Institute. Link naar het originele artikel
  9. A new study looks at the interaction between a specific protein and a type of receptor. Blocking this specific pathway may help treat Crohn's. Link naar het originele artikel
  10. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis supports evidence that children with mild asthma can effectively manage the condition by using their two inhalers—one a steroid and the other a bronchodilator—when symptoms occur. This is in contrast to the traditional method of using the steroid daily, regardless of symptoms, and the bronchodilator when symptoms occur. The as-needed use of both inhalers is just as effective for mild asthma as the traditional protocol, according to the investigators. Link naar het originele artikel
  11. Earlier
  12. Joachim

    Attacking asthma in kids

    According to the World Health Organization, asthma is the most prevalent chronic childhood disease worldwide. That's why researchers are working on developing technology that could predict when a child will have an asthma attack and provide prevention and treatment suggestions, according to an article in Chemical and Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. Link naar het originele artikel
  13. An extensive study has confirmed that the risk of developing coeliac disease is connected to the amount of gluten children consume. The new study is observational and therefore does not prove causation; however, it is the most comprehensive of its kind to date. The results are presented in the prestigious journal JAMA. Link naar het originele artikel
  14. Joachim

    Voorstellen Danielle

    Hallo Danielle, hoe gaat het met jullie?
  15. Joachim

    Voorstellen Teske 33

    Welkom op het forum Teske en erg vervelend om te lezen dat je moeder het er moeilijk mee heeft. Dit is geheel begrijpelijk en gelukkig heeft ze iig jou om haar te steunen. Weet je toevallig of het de chronische variant is of de acute Sarcoidose? Hartelijke groet, Joachim
  16. Sepsis occurs when the body goes overboard in its attempt to fight off an infection. Immune cells rush in, overreact and wreak havoc on tissues and organs, often resulting in organ failure and death. Link naar het originele artikel
  17. Joachim

    The High Cost of Waiting for Generic Alternatives

    Weeks after getting a script for what I hoped would be a cheaper alternative to Restasis (cyclosporine emulsion), I was reminded of why so many prescription medications are unaffordable. Three pharmaceutical companies recently agreed to pay California nearly $70 million to settle allegations that they paid to delay generic versions of the narcolepsy medication Provigil (modafinil) and the pain patch Lidoderm (lidocaine topical) from entering the market. Consumers aren’t always the hardest hit by the practice known as pay for delay. A portion of California’s settlement, like the federal settlement, is earmarked to compensate those who bought Provigil, Nuvigil, or modafinil during the timeframe. But those hurt most are people like myself, who can’t bear the cost of necessary brand prescriptions and must live without them because there are no generic alternatives. Pay for delay The alleged deals to keep generic versions of Provigil and Lidoderm off shelves aren’t isolated. Since 2005, generic versions of as many as 142 brand-name prescriptions have been delayed by pharmaceutical firms paying off would-be competitors, according to a report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG). Of 20 medications impacted by pay-for-delay deals, PIRG reported that generics were delayed an average of five years, and as long as nine years. Brand-name medications cost 10 times more on average. A generic version of Provigil, due to arrive in 2005, was kept off the market until 2012 after Cephalon paid more than $300 million to four generic drug manufacturers. After losing my job and health insurance coverage in 2011, my monthly price for Provigil skyrocketed from a $35 copay to $1,386 per month. My physician switched me to Nuvigil, which I was also unable to afford because a 2012 pay-for-delay deal kept its generic version from being released until 2016. Skirting the rules Patents on newly developed medications typically last 20 years before cheaper generic versions can enter the market. But the monopoly on profits is largely being extended by pharmaceutical companies adding new patents and exclusivities to existing medications, according to a study published last year. Among the findings of the study, which analyzed all prescription medications on the market between 2005 and 2015: Seventy-eight percent of medications associated with new patents were for existing medications. Nearly 40 percent of all medications on the market created additional market barriers by adding patents and exclusivities. Of the 100 bestselling medications, 70 percent had their protection extended at least once and 50 percent had it extended more than once. With a recent JAMA study showing prices have doubled since 2012 for many popular brand-name prescription medications, it’s no surprise that nearly a quarter of Americans struggle with prescription costs. The waiting game Allergan still holds a lock on Restasis, which aided in the firm’s better-than-expected quarterly profits. But after much legal wrangling, generic competition is expected to arrive this year. Since the dry-eye medication Xiidra I was recently prescribed costs about the same as the roughly $500 it would cost each month to fill my Restasis prescription, I’ll be happy to see a less expensive alternative. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post The High Cost of Waiting for Generic Alternatives appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  18. A new statistical analysis of Finland’s nationwide cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) registry found that sudden cardiac death plays a significant role in the outcome of CS patients, affirming the importance of risk assessment in this patient population. The study, “Sudden death in cardiac sarcoidosis: an analysis of nationwide clinical and cause-of-death registries,” was published in the European Heart Journal. CS is a type of inflammatory heart disease characterized by the clustering of white blood cells, or granulomas, in heart tissue. Granulomas that form in parts of the heart muscle that conduct electrical signals can cause irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias), and in some cases, heart failure. Typically, CS is diagnosed following the detection of abnormal heartbeat patterns, such as atrioventricular block or ventricular tachycardia (fast resting heart rate), as measured on an electrocardiogram (ECG) or an echocardiogram (heart sonogram). However, in some cases, CS is only diagnosed following an autopsy after a sudden, fatal cardiac event. Within the research community, there is an ongoing debate regarding the diagnosis and outcomes of these CS patients who are diagnosed after death — and who are thus considered clinically silent. To address this uncertainty, researchers in Finland analyzed CS patients’ records between 1998 and 2015, collected by the Myocardial Inflammatory Diseases in Finland (MIDFIN) study group, a nationwide clinical registry that curates CS patient information regarding diagnosis. The team also analyzed Finland’s national cause-of-death registry to identify clinically silent cases of CS that ended in sudden cardiac death over the same period. Researchers identified 351 cases of CS (mean age 52 years). The most common first sign of CS was atrioventricular block in 42% of patients; followed by left ventricular dysfunction with heart failure (17%); unexpected or aborted sudden cardiac death (14%), and sustained ventricular tachycardia (14%). In total, 84 deaths were recorded over the study period; only 22 of them (26%) occurred in patients diagnosed with CS while they were alive. Unexpected sudden cardiac death was found to be an important factor in CS outcomes, accounting for up to 80% of all fatalities in the CS cohort analyzed. Of note, sudden cardiac death from clinically silent CS was responsible for more than 40% of fatal CS cases. Interestingly, the researchers found that almost two-thirds of CS deaths were caused by “hidden or misdiagnosed cardiac involvement.” Researchers also estimated CS survival based on the data obtained. They reported that patients with CS have an 85% chance of living beyond five years after symptom onset, and a 76% chance of living beyond 10 years. With treatment, these estimates increased to 93% and 87% for 5- and 10-year survival, respectively. The data also showed a substantial increase in CS diagnosis over the time period analyzed, in addition to an increase in postmortem CS diagnosis and CS-linked deaths. According to the team, while the increase in diagnosis may be attributed to growing CS awareness and improvements in diagnostic tools, the increase in silent CS cases remains unclear. Overall, the team concluded that “together, fatal and aborted [sudden cardiac death] constitute 14% of the presenting manifestations of CS,” and that “nearly two-thirds of all fatalities from CS are caused by undiagnosed granulomas in the heart.” “The dominant role of SCD as the mode of death in CS emphasizes the importance of assessing the risk of fatal arrhythmias and planning preventive measures in each patient,” the researchers noted. The post Analysis Highlights Importance of Risk Assessment in Cardiac Sarcoidosis appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  19. By pinpointing the molecules that people with celiac disease release after gluten exposure, scientists step closer to a diagnostic blood test. Link naar het originele artikel
  20. Walnut consumption may offer protection against ulcerative colitis, according to a new study by researchers at UConn Health and Texas A&M University. Link naar het originele artikel
  21. Teske Swinnen

    Voorstellen Teske 33

    Hallo, mijn naam is Teske, 33 jaar, uit BE en recentelijk is bij men mams sarcoidose op de longen vastgesteld. Ik wil haar graag in contact brengen bij lotgenoten. Het is op de moment een zware weg en ontzettend moeilijk om symptomen te plaatsen. Ze is in stadium vier en de wens van de prof is te streven naar stadium twee. Herkent iemand zich hierin?
  22. There is no cure for the more than 1.6 million people in the United States living with Crohn's disease (CD) and its symptoms, including abdominal pain, intestinal distress and severe weight-loss. CD is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in which the body's own immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and treatment is focused on controlling the symptoms of the disease in its acute phase and managing it in remission. But recently, researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine identified a pathway in the immune system activated in CD and which holds promise for investigating new treatments. Link naar het originele artikel
  23. New research in mice suggests that stimulating a particular group of immune cells could counteract the autoimmune reaction in multiple sclerosis. Link naar het originele artikel
  24. A new study supports the use of virtual patients and in silico clinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness of blue light to reduce the symptoms of psoriasis. Researchers also demonstrated that this in silico approach can be used to improve the treatment response of patients with psoriasis to blue light by modifying the settings of the therapeutic protocol, as reported in the study published in Systems Medicine, an open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Link naar het originele artikel
  25. One out of four sepsis patients who survive their hospital stay have elevated levels of inflammation a year after discharge, and they are at higher risk for major health problems and death, according to a study led by physician-scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System. Link naar het originele artikel
  26. Before sarcoidosis hit me, I was a Pilates enthusiast and practiced yoga, too. Between classes and my practice at home, I stayed rather active with these two forms of exercise. However, like so much in life, the ability to stay active drastically changed after my diagnosis. But then an acquaintance introduced me to the ancient Chinese practice of tai chi. Tai chi, often called “meditative movement,” is a series of gentle, focused movements in a slow, fluid motion. These movements are combined with deep breathing. It sounds more difficult than it is. The practice is based on 10 principles, although there are literally thousands of different styles. Tai chi is a noncompetitive, self-paced form of exercise, which means you may be in a class with students of all abilities and levels. This form of exercise is great for stretching, balance, and calming the nervous system — perfect for someone with my symptoms. I was hesitant to try this new activity. The last thing I needed was to discover I was unable to partake in this activity, too. Yet, despite my concern, I was curious enough to give it a try. Those in the class I joined made the exercise look effortless. I couldn’t help but feel insecure. However, the individuals in the class, and the instructor, were all welcoming, non-judgmental, and patient. I quickly learned that many of them had health issues, too. From vertigo and other balance issues to high blood pressure and arthritis, participants in the class utilized tai chi to stay active despite health challenges. It’s generally a safe and effective form of exercise for those who may not be able to engage in other forms of physical activity. No special equipment or clothing is required to participate in tai chi. I wore loose, baggy clothing to allow for better movement. I was a little bewildered at first while attempting to learn the principles. This practice does require both focus and patience. Perhaps my background and training in several forms of dance did help me catch on, but there were many in that class who had no formal dance training yet did just fine. After being a little discombobulated at the start, I found myself enjoying the ease of the dance-like movements, the gentle breathing, and the soothing music. After class, I felt calmer and more relaxed. Perhaps most importantly, I spent an hour laughing over my blunders, having some fun with other individuals who had health challenges, and not thinking about my own health — a priceless combination. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post I’m Trying Tai Chi to Help Manage My Health Challenges appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  27. Joachim

    My Love-Hate Relationship with Prednisone

    Twice in the past month, a charley horse in my right calf has ripped me from blissful sleep. Even though prednisone wasn’t to blame for the agonizing 4 a.m. wake-up calls, it’s the first thing I thought about while lying in bed, writhing in pain. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve been put on prednisone to treat my sarcoidosis, but I’ll never forget its many horrible side effects, which is why I hate going on it and love being taken off it. Whenever possible, I seek alternatives because even short-term use of oral corticosteroids carries risks. However, I do have ways to push through the worst of its side effects. It’s not you; it’s the prednisone. I find an emotional anchor. When doctors prescribed me a high dose of prednisone after my sarcoidosis diagnosis, a friend who had been through steroid treatments gave me a warning. He told me I would do some crazy things, and I wouldn’t realize just how crazy I act except in hindsight once off the prednisone. He was right. Prednisone takes me on a roller coaster of emotional extremes. That’s why I always make sure I have someone I can count on whenever I need them to talk me off of the ledges of my crazy. Drink, eat, repeat. Prednisone sends my appetite into overdrive. It also depletes potassium, which causes unforgettable, nightmare cramping in my hands, legs, and feet, and causes fluid retention. I’ve largely escaped prednisone-associated weight gain and the dreaded “moon face” by drinking more water, consuming less sodium, and eating protein-rich foods (which make me feel full longer). I also eat plenty of vegetables and fruits — especially those rich in potassium, like bananas and sweet potatoes — to help combat muscle cramps. What is sleep? You’d think that battling muscle cramps, mood swings, and a relentless appetite would exhaust a person by the end of the day. Nope. Insomnia, which becomes more likely with dosage increases, was another surprise side effect of prednisone. I was able to reclaim sleep by taking my fully prescribed dose before 9 a.m., which is the optimal time, and taking Benadryl before bed, as recommended by my physician. I wage war on germs. Prednisone suppresses the immune system, so I wash my hands frequently, which is the best defense against germs. I also steer clear of anyone who is sick and avoid crowded public places — especially confined areas such as trains, buses, and planes — when possible. Side effects make life on prednisone miserable, but I’ll keep pushing through courses as needed, as long as the benefits outweigh the risks and harm. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post My Love-Hate Relationship with Prednisone appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  28. Using Jakafi (ruxolitinib) to treat a woman with polycythemia vera (PV; a blood cancer) led to complete resolution of her cutaneous sarcoidosis, and to mild reduction of her lung nodules, according to a case report. The findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy, especially for patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis, the researchers noted. The study, ”Resolution of cutaneous sarcoidosis after Janus kinase inhibitor therapy for concomitant polycythemia vera,” was published in the journal JAAD Case Reports. PV is a slow-growing blood cancer characterized by excessive generation of red blood cells and abnormal signaling mediated by the JAK2 protein. Although alterations in this pathway — called the JAK/STAT pathway — have been shown in sarcoidosis and linked with its severity, studies reporting an association between sarcoidosis and PV are rare. Now, a team at the University of Pennsylvania described the case of an African-American woman in her 60s with evidence of PV caused by a JAK2 gene mutation. She had a 12-month history of subcutaneous (under-the-skin) nodules in the bilateral triceps, but no cough, shortness of breath, ocular manifestations, or joint pain. Her PV was treated with daily aspirin and phlebotomy to remove the extra red blood cells as needed. A physical test confirmed the presence of the subcutaneous nodules in the arms, while a punch biopsy revealed sarcoidal granulomatous dermatitis, manifested as skin rash. Chest computed tomography showed extensive hilar lymphadenopathy — enlarged lymph nodes in the lung root — as well as several pulmonary nodules. The patient also showed a mild decrease in lung function, although she denied experiencing respiratory symptoms. The size of her skin lesions decreased upon local steroid injections, although multiple nodules remained. Systemic therapy was put off. Eight months later, the patient experienced headaches, and her increased blood counts did not respond to phlebotomy procedures. She was started on 10 mg of Jakafi (marketed by Incyte), a JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor, given twice daily. After five months of treatment with Jakafi, the patient’s PV was responding well to treatment, and her sarcoidal skin lesions had completely resolved. Upon examinations made at seven and nine months, she showed mild lessening of the lung nodules and of the enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes, located between the lungs. Of note, similar results — meaning a complete resolution of cutaneous disease, but a less marked response regarding pulmonary disease — have been observed with other targeted therapies for autoimmune conditions, including psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, the researchers stated. “Although the resolution of this patient’s sarcoidosis may be secondary to successful management of her PV, a more likely explanation is the direct suppression of sarcoidosis through JAK-STAT signaling inhibition,” the team said. “We conclude that JAK inhibitors may be a viable treatment option for sarcoidosis, especially cutaneous sarcoidosis, and further clinical and mechanistic studies are needed.” The post Jakafi Shows Promise for Treatment of Cutaneous Sarcoidosis, Report Says appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
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