Ga naar inhoud

Alle Activiteit

Deze weergave wordt automatisch ververst     

  1. Gisteren
  2. Joachim

    Sarcoidosis Is a Ticking Time Bomb

    I stopped at a tire center this month to have one of the tires on my car checked. The small bubble on the sidewall didn’t seem like a big deal to me, but I was told it was a ticking time bomb that could blow at any moment. That was an “Aha!” moment. Days earlier, I had struggled to explain to a close family friend what it meant to battle sarcoidosis. Ticking time bomb sums it up perfectly. That’s what it’s like to live with a disease that can attack my body anytime, anywhere. A roulette wheel Being diagnosed with sarcoidosis is like a spin of the roulette wheel. You hold your breath and wait to see where fate falls. Some get lucky and sarcoidosis disappears on its own without any treatment. Others, like me, are in a lengthy, wide-ranging battle. We try to anticipate where the next punch will land. Sometimes we manage symptoms enough to carry on with life, which was my case for several years. But out of nowhere, a knockout punch connects. It happened to me in April 2011. I went home from work expecting a week or two of bed rest to get my health back on track. But I wouldn’t work again until April 2018. And my fight to work full time continues. Baggage for life Sarcoidosis is frustrating because it’s unpredictable and can be difficult to diagnose and manage. But it is also difficult to be told you are in remission when your body doesn’t seem to have gotten the memo. Symptoms such as fatigue frequently persist in remission. It is not a fatigue that is cured by a few hours of sleep or a couple of cups of coffee. It can be downright debilitating, and it can be a long-lasting problem. Sarcoidosis can fool some into thinking it’s gone, only to pop back up in a different area of the body. That was the case with one woman who relapsed after nine years. Worse, some may not have been in remission. Many relapses may represent instances of the disease being suppressed, according to a study published in the European Respiratory Journal that found it’s impossible to determine when the disease is in remission. Forging ahead For $249, I bought a tire and the peace of mind that I was no longer driving on a ticking time bomb. It’s not that easy with sarcoidosis, as I explained to the family friend I’ve called “aunt” my entire life. The best that we can do is forge ahead, hope for the best, and make the most of those days when we have the upper hand. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Sarcoidosis Is a Ticking Time Bomb appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  3. Researchers at Swinburne have created a device that lets users assess and track their own respiratory condition. The device is currently in clinical trials in hospitals in Melbourne, Sydney and the UK. Link naar het originele artikel
  4. Laatste week
  5. aTyr Pharma announced a collaboration and license agreement with Kyorin Pharmaceutical to develop and commercialize ATYR1923, its potential disease-modifying treatment for those with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), including pulmonary sarcoidosis, in Japan. ATYR1923 is a fusion protein that contains a portion of a human antibody linked to a protein called histidyl tRNA synthetase. It has been designed to suppress immune responses associated with lung inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) by modulating the activity of the neuropilin-2 (NRP-2) receptor protein. “We are very pleased to enter into this collaboration with Kyorin, a leading respiratory focused pharmaceutical company in Japan,” Sanjay Shukla, MD, president and CEO of aTyr, said in a press release. “As in the U.S., ILDs represent an area of significant unmet medical need in Japan, and Kyorin’s development and commercial capabilities will enhance our ability to improve the lives of patients with these serious conditions. We believe this collaboration further validates ATYR1923, and potentially accelerates development in other ILDs,” Shukla added. The safety, tolerability, early efficacy, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetic properties of ATYR1923 are currently being investigated in up to 36 people with pulmonary sarcoidosis in a Phase 1b/2a clinical trial (NCT03824392). (Immunogenicity is the ability a compound to trigger an immune response; and pharmacokinetics studies how a therapy affect the body: how it’s absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and eliminated.) Patients will be randomly assigned to either ATYR1923 at a dose of 1.0, 3.0, or 5.0 mg/kg, or a placebo every four weeks. The main goal of the trial, which is recruiting at about a dozen sites across the U.S., is to assess the incidence of treatment side effects from the study’s start (baseline) until week 24. A pre-planned interim analysis of the first 15 people treated in the trial indicated that ATYR1923 has a good safety profile, with only mild-to-moderate adverse events reported. Most were found to be unrelated to the treatment. Under the terms of the agreement, Kyorin will hold the exclusive right to develop and commercialize ATYR1923 in Japan. The company will also be responsible for funding all research, development, regulatory, marketing, and commercialization activities related to ATYR1923 in the country. In turn, aTyr will receive an upfront payment of $8 million, and be eligible for additional payments totaling up to $167 million once certain developmental, regulatory, and sales milestones are achieved. aTyr will supply all therapeutic products for Japan, and provide additional developmental support. “We are excited to enter into this agreement with aTyr and bring this new, potentially first-in-class drug to Japanese ILD patients,” said Yutaka Ogihara, president and CEO of Kyorin Holdings, the parent company of Kyorin Pharmaceuticals. The post aTyr and Kyorin Partner to Bring Potential Lung Sarcoidosis Treatment, ATYR1923, to Japan appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  6. Joachim

    Cancer: Using copper to boost immunotherapy

    Scientists have successfully destroyed cancer cells in mice by using copper-based nanoparticles and immunotherapy. Importantly, the cancer did not return. Link naar het originele artikel
  7. Joachim

    Reevaluating What’s Important in Life

    A couple of weeks ago, I endured a full week of medical testing to see if alternative therapies might help me to live better with sarcoidosis. Needless to say, I was thrilled when it was all over. Last weekend, I planned to do absolutely nothing. I even told my kids I wouldn’t be driving anywhere. I just wanted to sit back and relax in front of the television and watch all of my favorite cooking shows and any good movies I could find. Testing takes a lot out of me, especially when I don’t receive immediate results while I’m with the physician. But there was a slight deviation from my initial plan. A new brewery a few blocks from my house had its grand opening on Friday night. My wife’s birthday was during the week I had testing, so as a consolation for her accompanying me to my appointments, we agreed to check out the new place. As an avid homebrewer, I thought it would be fun to visit a local brewer in my community. We also looked forward to seeing our son’s photography displayed on the brewery’s wall. Our son is a local photographer here in Philly, and on occasion, local businesses and galleries ask to hang some of his work. As a proud poppa, I wanted to see his work and the brewery. “Age.” (Photo by Cameron Harris) My wife, her mother, and I decided to go early when my wife got home from work (which turned out to be a good idea). We arrived before the grand opening crowd took over the space. I thought it would be a good adventure for me. Having spent the week seeing doctors, taking tests, and getting stuck with needles, it was the welcome diversion I needed to clear my head and regroup. I also considered that the outing would test my patience. In the past two years, I haven’t been among many crowds. The largest crowds I’ve seen were at the supermarket and the doctor’s office. Surprisingly, when we arrived, we immediately got seats in the art gallery, and I saw my son’s photographs. I pointed them out to my wife and mother-in-law, and they were pleased as well. I took photos of his prints and texted them to him. His response was great! “Time Flies.” (Photo by Cameron Harris) We stayed for about an hour or so, sampled two of the signature beers, and then decided to leave as the crowd was becoming larger than I was used to. But we had a good time nonetheless. Things happen for a reason We arrived home and debated dinner plans, as the brewery didn’t serve food. Since I planned to stay in all weekend, I decided to get comfortable and relax in front of the television while my wife and daughter handled dinner. One of my favorite cooking shows was on. I sat down to watch it. Then it happened. In the middle of the broadcast, the signal froze. That was it — no more television. I changed the channel and nothing. I turned everything off and back on. Nothing. I went to the kitchen and picked up the telephone. (We’re one of the two families left in the world that has a landline.) Nothing. The phone was dead, too. At that point, I was aggravated, but what could I do? I tried calling the phone company several times but was put on hold for more than an hour. It looked like my plans were a bust. But I began to think that maybe this wasn’t so bad. On Saturday morning, the TV service was still out. So I offered to take my wife to our local produce market, and we had fun. When we returned home, I found myself doing things I hadn’t done in some time because I had allowed my health to dictate my life. I found a few books I had been looking for and started looking through some photos I had taken during my career. I’d been putting off sorting through my photos, so maybe this was the right time for me to get it done. I plan to sell some of them like my son does. The more I did other things instead of watching television, the more I felt I was actually accomplishing something. A technician arrived on Sunday afternoon to fix the problem. Truth be told, it wasn’t so bad reconnecting with my family and myself. Sometimes it’s best to take a step back to reconnect with yourself, especially if you have medical issues. I highly recommend it — I’m sure you’ve been missed. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Reevaluating What’s Important in Life appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  8. West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to Hokkaido University researchers. They also discovered that a drug can induce autophagy to remove protein aggregates and thus prevent cell death. Link naar het originele artikel
  9. dgotje

    Voorstellen dgotje

    Prednison was 35 mg... Na 1 jaar geen spieren meer, ben een slappe kerel geworden... Dus nu begonnen in de sportschool om weer sterk te worden. Tijdens de afbouw van prednison had ik veel last van spiertrekkingen.. maar dat is nu over.
  10. Joachim

    Voorstellen dgotje

    Goedemorgen Dave en welkom op het forum, Hoe was je ervaring met de pred kuur? Ik weet niet hoe zwaar hij was maar let goed op je spierkracht omdat pred nog wel eens kan zorgen dat dat achteruit gaat. Hopelijk zijn je afkickverschijnselen niet te erg. Grt, Joachim
  11. Years ago, I took a young family member to acting classes for eight weeks. The class focused on improvisation, also known as improv. During that two-month period, I learned so much about the fine art of acting. Recently, I recognized how this has helped me deal with sarcoidosis. Improv is based on spontaneous performance. This means it is not planned beforehand. Improv differs from what happens in most performances. Typically, actors memorize lines prior to appearing on stage. Improv, on the other hand, requires quick reactions and clear thinking. In addition, performers have no knowledge of what will come next. One rule of improv is replying “yes” to what was said before. In other words, actors agree with what the previous performer said. Another rule involves building on that same thought. This is done by adding “and” to the statement. So, saying, “Yes, and …” allows scenes to evolve onstage. I recently recognized how the rules of improv relate to my experience since my sarcoidosis diagnosis. I was unprepared for sarcoidosis. There was no rehearsal, studying, or planning involved in this aspect of my life. Instead, I found myself employing spontaneous reactions and relying on clear-headed thinking as much as possible. Every time I would receive new information or speak with another practitioner, I would listen as closely as possible. After taking time to digest the additional information, I’d then ask a question: “And what next?” Essentially, I was building on what I already had learned along the way. This information came from research and other practitioners, and through trial and error. I was, in effect, applying the improv approach to this process. Yet, I didn’t even realize I was doing so. I believe this approach led me to try treatments such as acupuncture, infrared sauna, and an anti-inflammatory diet. The improv approach also led me to new practitioners, organizations that focus on sarcoidosis, and other individuals who also have rare health conditions. When it comes to managing a chronic health condition, we’re all really improv actors. We navigate practitioners and treatment options the best we can. This is done without any preparation or rehearsal. I would have preferred to have more preparation for sarcoidosis. Yet, I am confident that adding the “Yes, and …” rule of improv has been beneficial. By doing so, this production that is my life became a little more enlightening and informative. At the least, utilizing improv helps keep life moving along. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Applying the Rules of Improv to Sarcoidosis Management appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  12. Earlier
  13. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a category of refractory inflammatory disease, of which ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are the main types. Link naar het originele artikel
  14. Joachim

    Clearing the Clutter for Better Health

    The unpredictability of sarcoidosis can make life chaotic, which has made me a bit of a control freak, as my sister found out when we traveled together last year. After taking in the breathtaking view of Boston Harbor from our hotel window, my burning question was which bed she wanted. Little did she know that upon choosing, she signed away all rights to touch, sit, or put anything on my bed for the duration of the trip. I feel better when things are neat and orderly — as it turns out, it’s not just my imagination. I discovered that clearing clutter, something I always feel compelled to do when a new year rolls in, has surprising health benefits. Recognizing you have a problem For the most part, I keep my place fairly clutter-free. But it often feels like I’m fighting a losing battle when it comes to paperwork. I’m drowning in it. My drawers always seem to gradually revert to a jumbled mess after I organize them. To be honest, I’m cheating big-time to keep my place as clutter-free as it is now. Not only am I not fully unpacked from my last move, but my stuffed storage unit has become a place I dread when I need to find something. On a recent Monday morning, as I stood knee-deep in boxes searching for a shoulder bag, and after I had already wasted a weekend looking for a credit card, I vowed to make getting rid of clutter a priority. The benefits of tidying up Clutter can cause stress, make it more difficult to focus, and even affect sleep when it rises to the level of hoarding, as the Mayo Clinic notes. While disorderly environments can lead to more creativity, those in orderly rooms tend to make healthier food choices, according to this 2013 study. Left unchecked, clutter can affect mental health and relationships, according to a DePaul University study published in 2016. The idea that clutter can have negative effects isn’t new. A 2010 study by UCLA’s Center for the Everyday Lives of Families found a correlation between clutter and women’s cortisol levels and moods. In the study, women perceiving their homes as cluttered or unfinished reported less marital satisfaction and greater depression during the day and more fatigue in the evening. Tackling clutter To keep your home clutter-free, you need to identify the personality traits that led to your downfall to begin with, according to a recent HuffPost article that provides decluttering advice. Choosing to spend money on experiences, such as vacations, instead of material possessions can make life happier and less cluttered. For the time-pressed, the “Rule of Five” decluttering tip offered by HouseLogic.com may be the answer. It’s simple: Every time you get up from your desk or walk through a room, put five things away or devote five minutes each hour to decluttering. Numerous other news articles, books, and even television shows address the topic of decluttering, so why not give it a try? Research shows that it could benefit your health. What are your decluttering tips? Please share in the comments below. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Clearing the Clutter for Better Health appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  15. Joachim

    Giving TB vaccine intravenously boosts efficacy

    New research in macaques finds that changing the delivery method of an existing tuberculosis vaccine can drastically improve its efficacy. Link naar het originele artikel
  16. The transplantation program at Stanford Medicine has hit a milestone with its 1,000th procedure — performed on a 54-year-old woman with sarcoidosis. The surgery, carried under the Heart-Lung & Lung Transplantation Program at Stanford Health Care, is now part of the 750 lung transplants and 250 heart-lung transplants performed to date by physicians at Stanford. The patient, Alicia Bland, was 22 when she was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory disorder that can cause severe damage to the lungs. At the time, her physician told her she had approximately 10 years to live. Bland went on to live with the disease for decades under regular medical supervision, but she had a hard time breathing and was unable to work. Over time, her lung function worsened to the point where physicians told her she needed a lung transplant, and advised her to move out of her home in the San Joaquin Valley due to the area’s poor air quality, which exacerbated her condition. “I was scared,” Bland said in a news story about that time. Nevertheless, she moved to San Jose with her friend and caregiver, Roscoe Little, and started visiting Stanford’s pre-transplant clinic. Before she could be put on the transplant list, Bland was told she needed to lose weight. She managed to lose 30 pounds with the help of dietitians, nurses, and counselors at Stanford’s clinic, and was finally put on the transplant waitlist. At 54, and after being on the waitlist for about a month, she got a call from the clinic. “They say they have some lungs for me!” Bland told Little at the time. After 24 hours, Bland had her lungs taken out and replaced with the healthy lungs of a person who had recently died and donated their organs. After nearly three decades, she was able to breathe well again. “This surgery went very smoothly, and the patient had a really good recovery,” said John W. MacArthur, MD, assistant professor of cardiothoracic surgery and the surgeon who performed Bland’s surgery. MacArthur said he loves doing transplants due to the rapid and dramatic improvements he sees in his patients. “It’s challenging, but it’s very rewarding to see somebody who can’t breathe comfortably, or not well at all, go home and not need any supplemental oxygen,” he said. Bland had her surgery on Oct. 10, 2019, and was discharged two weeks later. Her lung transplant was the 1,000th procedure performed by physicians at Stanford. “It’s a milestone,” Gundeep Dhillon, MD, the medical director of the program, said. “A lung transplant is something that truly takes a village, one that includes the patient; his or her caretakers; the donor and the donor’s family; our interdisciplinary team of health care providers, including surgeons and nurses; a rehabilitation team; pulmonologists; dieticians; therapists; and more. It’s an amazing team effort.” Since the first heart-lung transplant performed in Stanford in 1981, patient outcomes have improved significantly. The five-year survival rate for those undergoing heart-lung and lung transplants today is around 60%, according to Dhillon. This figure may increase even more in the near future, with improvements in surgical techniques and pre- and post-transplant care. Within a few weeks after surgery, Bland’s breathing capacity improved from 24% to 82%. For the first time in more than a decade, she no longer had to use an oxygen tank. “The transplant team, they’re my angels,” Bland said. “They gave me a second chance at life.” Bland still experiences chest pain around her stitches, as well as severe indigestion, a common post-surgery complaint. Although she is able to walk by herself, she uses a walker when she feels her legs start to weaken. All these complications are expected to resolve soon, according to her healthcare team. For the time being, her chest X-rays, her blood count and, most importantly, her breathing all look good. The post Stanford Program Reaches Milestone With 1,000th Transplant Performed on Woman with Sarcoidosis appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  17. dgotje

    Voorstellen dgotje

    Hallo, mijn naam is Dave, ben 46 jaar en sinds januari 2019 weet ik dat ik Sarcoïdose heb. In januari kwam ik in het ziet terecht na een jaar te hebben gehoest en constant een griep gevoel. In december begonnen allerlei lymfeklieren op te zetten in mijn lichaam, nek hals, oksels, lies... Even dacht men dat ik lymfklierkanker had, maar gelukkig (hoe bij kan je er mee zijn) was dat niet zo. Heb nu een jaar achter de rug met een zware prednison kuur. Sinds een paar weken gestopt... Met de hoop dat alles rustig zou blijven, maar helaas de symptomen beginnen al weer....
  18. Martin Luther King Jr. Day falls on Jan. 20 this year. On this national holiday, Americans are encouraged to volunteer to serve their communities. If you are unable to participate, there’s a good reason to find other ways to be charitable this year: your health. Being charitable has health benefits People with sarcoidosis face a wide range of health issues, including pain, depression, and cognitive impairment. Our battles with sarcoidosis can cause stress, affect our quality of life, and at times make us feel as if we’ve lost our sense of purpose. Fortunately, it turns out that the simple act of giving can be an elixir for many ailments, whether we choose to donate our time, money, or thoughtfulness to others. Killing pain with kindness One day recently, I was reading on the couch with the television droning on in the background when news linking charitable acts to reductions in pain and other health benefits caught my attention. Volunteering and donating to charitable causes make us feel good emotionally. Just over 30 percent of the adult population in the United States — 77.34 million — gave 6.9 billion hours of their time to causes in 2017, a record high, according to the 2018 Volunteering in America report. I had been aware of research that shows that altruistic behavior has an instant effect on the brain’s pleasure centers. But I was surprised to learn that helping others affects the areas that control pain, too. For those of us battling daily chronic pain, volunteering provides an alternative option for nonpharmaceutical relief. The gift that keeps on giving Reduction in pain levels isn’t the only benefit of adopting a charitable attitude. A recent CNN report looked at studies that link volunteering to numerous other health benefits, including less stress, reduced depression, and greater longevity. The generosity of volunteers spills into other areas of their lives as well, with volunteers donating to charities at twice the rate of nonvolunteers. The former are involved in their communities and engage more with their neighbors, according to the Volunteering in America report. Even informal acts of kindness positively benefit our health. This makes sense to me because I’ve found that helping others, especially when they don’t know about it, makes me feel good. Small gestures such as raking leaves or shoveling snow from a neighbor’s property while they are at work can make a difference. There are limitless ways to give, and mounds of research show that doing so can help your health. If you would like to jump-start your volunteering by participating in the MLK Day of Service, you can search for opportunities in your local community here. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Giving Is Its Own Reward for Those with Chronic Illness appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  19. Joachim

    What are the benefits of cold and hot showers?

    Cold showers and hot showers may have different effects on the body. In this article, learn about the potential benefits of each, as well as some risks. Link naar het originele artikel
  20. Joachim

    Body temperature: What is the new normal?

    A new study finds that the average human body temperature has declined over the last 2 centuries. This may indicate other physiological changes. Link naar het originele artikel
  21. According to recent experiments in mouse models, a flu shot may effectively shrink cancer tumors and boost the effectiveness of immunotherapy. Link naar het originele artikel
  22. Joachim

    What to know about white blood cells

    White blood cells are vital for immune system functioning. In this article, learn about what types there are and what can affect them. Link naar het originele artikel
  23. Joachim

    Psoriasis: Towards a novel therapeutic approach

    Psoriasis is a frequent skin inflammatory disorder affecting 3% of the population. Psoriasis is characterized by hyperproliferation and defect of epidermal differentiation, leading to the scaly appearance of the skin. Psoriatic skin also presents an increase in blood vessels, leading to the redness of the skin lesions and is associated with immune infiltration. Link naar het originele artikel
  24. While sarcoidosis affecting the testicles is rare, it can be a cause of infertility in men, according to a new case report. The report, “Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of infertility: A case report,” was published in Urology Case Reports. Sarcoidosis is characterized by the formation of abnormal lumps of inflammatory cells — known as granulomas — in different organs. The lungs are most commonly affected, but any organ can be involved. However, involvement of genital and urinary organs (urogenital sarcoidosis) is rare. Testicular problems are also rare in urogenital sarcoidosis patients. In fact, only about 60 cases testicular dysfunction due to sarcoidosis have been reported. This report presents the case of a 31-year-old man who came to a clinic in Turkey with complaints of infertility. Physicians performed a thorough physical examination, and found that while both testicles were normally shaped and had adequate volume, a sperm analysis showed azoospermia (semen containing little or no sperm). The man underwent several laboratory tests to assess tumor markers and hormones such as prolactin, testosterone, and estradiol. Laboratory test results were found to be normal. A scrotal ultrasonography (USG) — imaging of the testicles and the surrounding area of the scrotum — found differences in both testicles. So physicians conducted a scrotal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which showed hypoechoic areas (meaning areas with solid mass) in the testicles. Since the patient had recurrent cough for three weeks, a chest X-ray was taken and revealed the presence of immune cells in the lungs. As physicians suspected the patient had sarcoidosis, they performed HRCT (high-resolution computed tomography), an imaging technique commonly used to diagnose sarcoidosis. HRCT results revealed widespread fibrotic changes (when tissue becomes damaged and scarred) in both lungs. The patient was referred to a pulmonary disease clinic where he underwent further diagnostic tests, but no malignancy nor Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection was detected. Physicians then performed an open testicular biopsy to collect a small tissue sample from the testicles, which revealed the presence of numerous granulomas covering the entire parenchyma (functional tissue of an organ). As these findings were compatible with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, the man was placed on oral steroid therapy. He responded to the treatment within six months, and lesions (granulomas) within the lungs and testicles resolved within three months. One year later, the patient was able to have a child without the use of assisted reproductive techniques. “Although testicular sarcoidosis is a rare condition, it may result in infertility. Therefore, clinicians should carefully investigate infertility patients with unknown etiology [origin] and systemic symptoms. After excluding the malignancies, sarcoidosis should be kept in mind” as a potential diagnosis, the researchers concluded. The post Testicular Sarcoidosis Can Be Cause of Infertility, Case Report Finds appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  25. Joachim

    Scientists draw closer to a dementia vaccine

    A new mouse study uses a two-pronged approach to designing a vaccine for dementia. The results are encouraging, and a clinical trial may be on the horizon. Link naar het originele artikel
  26. Could bile acids—the fat-dissolving juices churned out by the liver and gallbladder—also play a role in immunity and inflammation? Link naar het originele artikel
  27. Joachim

    Tragedy Prompts Introspection About the New Year

    This holiday season was not what I had expected. As I get older, I guess I have lost a lot of the childish excitement I used to feel during the holidays. As with most people, life gets in the way. Things change, and we lose family members and friends. But the holidays never take a break. We must adjust the best we can, while talking ourselves through the merriment in hopes of participating in all things festive. Ten days before Christmas, I was watching our local news. A terrible car accident happened in another part of the city, near some friends of mine. Two fatalities were reported, caused by drunk drivers who were racing and blew a stoplight. Another vehicle with four young women in it was struck. The news reports said the women’s car had the right of way. One of them didn’t make it. A person from the other vehicle didn’t, either. The news footage was horrible. The holidays were upon us, yet multiple lives would be affected by destruction and death. The next day, I received some startling news that overtook my emotions. I was informed that the young woman who lost her life in the accident was a friend of our family. She was good friends with my son and some of his friends. I immediately remembered her spending time at my house, particularly on Sundays, when the “college kids” would hang out with my son. I had made it a point to have home-cooked meals for the kids. They loved it, and I loved having them over every week. I broke the news to my wife, who was floored. It was one of those rare moments when we were both speechless. She later told our daughter, who was shocked. I can’t imagine what this young woman’s family is going through. The tragedy prompted me to think about life and how we affect those around us, even when we don’t realize that we have an impact. I also thought about the seriousness of my health issues. I’ve realized recently that I need to start doing more of what I used to do to enjoy life again. This young woman was 29, in school, and enjoying life. From what I knew about her, she was a good, family-oriented person who was respectful and had a good sense of humor. While hospitalized over the past two years, I let a lot of time slip away from me. Some of that lost time carried over to my daily life at home. The reasons included guilt, anguish, fear, and a failure to accept that my health has changed, and that I must change with it. Although I’ve always kept myself moving in a positive direction, I also admit that these things have left me mentally paralyzed. I remember that this young woman always had a smile on her face. She was always pleasant and laughing, and had a personable warmth about her. I’ll never forget her smile, her laughter, and her warm spirit. The thing I can keep with me about her is the knowledge that every day is a new adventure, and we should always continue to explore the journey of our lives. We never know which adventure holds the most meaningful experience for us. Nothing in life is promised, as I’ve witnessed. My mantra going forward for the coming decades is to “bite off more than I can chew, and chew it!” *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Tragedy Prompts Introspection About the New Year appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  28. A previously unknown autoinflammatory condition has come to the fore thanks to a team of global experts, who were also able to identify its root cause. Link naar het originele artikel
  1. Laad meer activiteit
×
×
  • Maak Nieuw...

Belangrijke Informatie

Wij hebben cookies op uw apparaat geplaatst, welke ervoor zorgen dat dit forum beter functioneert. U kunt uw cookie instellingen aanpassen, anders gaan wij ervan uit dat u ermee instemt om door te gaan.