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  2. Joachim

    Spreading Gratitude Throughout the Seasons

    The holidays are upon us, and like so many people, I have a lot to be thankful for. I was recuperating from lengthy hospital stays during the holidays the past two years. This year, however, is different. For the first time in two years, I can enjoy the holidays with family and friends and not worry so much about my health. I’m still concerned about my health, but I’m choosing to enjoy the holidays this year. Who knows what next year has to offer? I’m taking advantage of the good times now. I’m celebrating the end of the decade. At one point, I wasn’t sure if I’d be able to enjoy the season fully. Holiday commercials were airing during Halloween, and the bombardment of advertising takes the joy out of focusing on gratitude. It wasn’t long ago I was released from the hospital around September of last year. I tried to return to a sense of normalcy, but it was hard to focus on my mental health after spending so much time in the hospital. I made a point to track my progress by acknowledging the things I could do and the challenges I overcame. Needing to use oxygen is a consequence of pulmonary sarcoidosis. I was tethered to an in-home concentrator while I recuperated. Initially, it was awkward because of the hoses, but my family and I grew used to it. It became something of a joke. I was exceedingly thankful to be home with my immediate family and close friends. Two months earlier, my prognosis was looking sketchy because of subcutaneous emphysema. I was intubated in the hospital. They secured my hands to the bed to prevent me from removing the tube. My wife set a small whiteboard and marker next to my hand so I could write messages. It was difficult to write, but for the most part, my notes were short and fairly easy to read. I remember thanking my family for allowing me to be a part of their lives. One of the nurses saw the message and said that I’d be able to tell them myself soon enough. She continued to reassure me that everything was going to work out. I just had to remain patient. I think her small gesture accelerated my recovery. You never realize that the simplest act of kindness can do wonders for a person. It’s the little things in life After that experience, I made a point to not only be thankful for everything in my life — the good and the bad — but grateful as well. I appreciate this adventure. Despite my sarcoidosis, and despite needing to use oxygen from time to time, I’m grateful that my family has stayed by my side. I’m grateful that I’ve gone an entire year without being hospitalized (knock on wood). I’m grateful for the friends I still have, the friends I lost along the way, and the friends I regained. Until you reach deep inside yourself to find gratitude for everything (including the obstacles), it’s easy to take people and situations for granted. We should focus on being thankful for everything in our lives — things we celebrate and things we don’t — throughout all seasons. As I often say, “Every day is a new adventure.” Why not start by being thankful for your daily adventure and grateful that you have a purpose in life? You never know what gifts you’re able to share until they’re required of you. Share what you’re thankful for. It can make a meaningful difference. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Spreading Gratitude Throughout the Seasons appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  3. Laatste week
  4. Scientists from Australia and the US have discovered and identified the genetic cause of a previously unknown human autoinflammatory disease. Link naar het originele artikel
  5. Psoriasis is a skin disorder that affects at least 100 million individuals worldwide. Its economic impact is more than $10 billion annually in the U.S. alone. Involved skin becomes thickened, red, and covered with silvery scales, while changes to the nails and deforming inflammation of the joints may also occur in up to one-third of affected individuals. The underlying cause of psoriasis remains a mystery, and effective targeted therapies remain to be developed. Link naar het originele artikel
  6. Joachim

    A vaccine against chronic inflammatory diseases

    In animals, a vaccine modifying the composition and function of the gut microbiota provides protection against the onset of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and certain metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity. This research was conducted by the team of Benoît Chassaing, Inserm researcher at Institut Cochin (Inserm/CNRS/Université de Paris), whose initial findings have been published in Nature Communications. Link naar het originele artikel
  7. The holiday season is here once again. Before sarcoidosis, I embraced the holidays as a festive time. Things have changed since then. However, I have found a “recipe” for approaching the holiday season: a way to stay as stress-free and healthy as possible, despite my chronic illness. I start with a dash of self-discipline when it comes to my diet. Sweets, alcohol, and rich foods are abundant this time of year, but I limit my intake of seasonal goodies. Self-discipline may not be a popular ingredient, but I believe it helps keep my health on track. Also, I follow a gluten-free diet, so I always have gluten-free items with me in case a host or hostess does not. Then I add a smidgen of rest and sleep. I typically require nine to 10 hours of sleep every night, and sometimes an afternoon nap, too. I need quiet and periods of rest more than I did before my diagnosis. Those are difficult to find during holiday festivities. It makes traveling a challenge. Next, a speck of self-awareness. In the early days of my diagnosis, I was self-conscious about telling people that I needed to rest, especially in the middle of the day or during a celebration. I have since learned not to be ashamed about doing what I need to feel as alert and refreshed as possible throughout the holidays. I mix in a tad of planning for specific items that I might need to pack. If I’m traveling to see family, I bring as many comforts of home as I can. My pillow, white noise machine, sleep mask, and earplugs help me maintain my sleep routine. I can’t forget a pinch of tolerance for dealing with challenging people. Difficult individuals are often unavoidable because of their place in a family. However, I have found ways to approach difficult and sometimes toxic people optimistically. When I’m well-rested and have tended to my own needs throughout the holidays, difficult individuals become much less challenging. Finally, I remember to add getting out in nature, taking time to play with our dog, or bundling up and taking a short walk around the block. I top off this recipe with maintaining a good sense of humor. Yes, special considerations can be necessary for people with chronic health conditions during the holidays. However, with planning, preparation, and the right ingredients, the holiday season can still be a wonderful time of year. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post My Recipe for Surviving the Holidays with Sarcoidosis appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  8. Joachim

    Excessive blood fat could cause organ damage

    Researchers have identified the mechanism through which high blood fat levels induce inflammation, raising the risk of organ damage and vascular problems. Link naar het originele artikel
  9. Targeted immunization against bacterial flagellin, a protein that forms the appendage that enables bacterial mobility, can beneficially alter the intestinal microbiota, decreasing the bacteria's ability to cause inflammation and thus protecting against an array of chronic inflammatory diseases, according to a new study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences and the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University. Link naar het originele artikel
  10. A new study suggests that specialized immune cells that dampen inflammation and help repair the gut could be used as a potential therapy for children dealing with the painful symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Link naar het originele artikel
  11. A new study in roundworms and elderly mice suggests that even the inactivated form of a probiotic bacterium could reduce inflammation and promote health. Link naar het originele artikel
  12. Joachim

    Viral Bouts Had Me Longing for a Virtual Doctor

    I had my flu shot at the beginning instead of the tail end of flu season this year. Unfortunately, there’s no vaccine for the seasonal viruses currently making the rounds. I fought off the first bug with vitamin C, tea, honey, and over-the-counter cold medicine. Thoughts of virtual medicine from my sickbed Then, one week later, a second wave arrived, hellbent, like the character Daenerys of House Targaryen from HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” on me “bending the knee” and submitting to its reign. I fought valiantly for two weeks before being reduced to kneeling over the porcelain throne, doing my best imitation of a cat with a hairball. Crawling back into bed with the battle lost, I knew that I would have to summon the strength to go to the doctor. I longed for the convenience of a virtual doctor visit. From the comfort of home I first used virtual healthcare in 2016 through a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic who was treating my postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. I loved it. Instead of traveling to Cleveland every three months for follow-up visits, I simply signed onto my iPad and had a video chat with my doctor. Being treated virtually meant more work on my end: I had to keep a daily diary of my heart rate and symptoms during exercise. I sent the information to my physician before our scheduled video chat. The detailed logs of my days helped my physician treat me and assisted me in the management of my health by identifying patterns of behavior and other factors that affected my well-being. Wave of the future? The Cleveland Clinic is expanding its digital health footprint through a new partnership with American Well, announced in October. More than 96 percent of health systems surveyed last year plan to expand virtual care services in the next year. Healthcare providers aren’t the only ones jumping into telemedicine. In September, Amazon announced plans to launch Amazon Care, a virtual primary care clinic. Last month, CVS Health’s MinuteClinic announced the expansion of its telehealth service into three more states. The service, available in 40 states, offers virtual visits to treat minor illnesses, injuries, and skin conditions. Removing virtual hurdles My cardiologist retired the following year, taking the convenience of my virtual visits with him. None of my current physicians offers the service, which I hadn’t thought would be possible because of the need for hands-on examinations. But then I read an interesting article about TytoHome, a hand-held device that enables you to use attachments so doctors can listen to your pulse or see your throat or ear remotely. The device is available from Best Buy for $300. I found this to be too pricey. But after dragging myself into the shower, getting dressed, and clearing snow off my car to drive to the doctor, I consider it a bargain. Hoping everyone stays warm and healthy this winter. *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Viral Bouts Had Me Longing for a Virtual Doctor appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  13. Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have identified a dead probiotic that reduces age-related leaky gut in older mice. The study is published in the journal GeroScience. Link naar het originele artikel
  14. The lungs of patients with sarcoidosis are burdened with a more active subset of immune T-cells, called mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, a study reports. The activity of these MAIT cells correlates with worse disease, supporting their potential as therapeutic targets, the researchers said. The study, “Activation of mucosal-association invariant T cells in the lungs of sarcoidosis patients,” was published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports. In sarcoidosis, the overactivation of the immune system causes small clumps of inflammatory cells known as granulomas to form in different tissues and organs, potentially disrupting their function. Previous research has shed light on the types of immune cells and cytokines, or signaling molecules, involved in the immune response that leads to granuloma formation, including immune T-cells. Innate T-cells, a subset of T-cells that respond very rapidly upon activation, are present in several tissues, and include both invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and MAIT cells. iNKT cells have been linked previously with sarcoidosis. Now, researchers in Japan looked at the role of MAIT cells in sarcoidosis, and whether their activation can serve as a potential biomarker for disease activity. MAIT cells are thought to be involved in antimicrobial immunity — since these cells quickly produce cytokines when activated by specific microbial molecules — and have been implicated in autoimmune diseases. In fact, researchers found that MAIT cells from sarcoidosis patients were activated by Cutibacterium acnes, “the only microorganism that has been isolated in bacterial cultures of sarcoidosis granulomas.” This supports a role for MAIT cells in sarcoidosis. The investigators then measured the number of MAIT cells and the levels of specific proteins at the cells’ surface in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or BALF, a small sample of the fluid present in the lungs) of 40 sarcoidosis patients (mean age of 57 years), and 28 healthy controls (mean age of 54 years). In the blood, the proportion of MAIT cells was lower in sarcoidosis patients (1.03%) compared with healthy controls (2.51%). The proportion of iNKT cells showed no difference. However, despite the lower levels, MAIT cells were found to be more active in sarcoidosis patients, as indicated by the higher levels of CD69 and programmed death 1 markers. The levels of other activation markers, including TIM-3 and LAG-3, showed no significant differences between both groups. Next, the team tested the association between MAIT cell activity — as indicated by the levels of the activation marker CD69 — and disease activity. The levels of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) are currently used as clinical markers to evaluate disease activity in sarcoidosis. When researchers analyzed their correlation with CD69, they found that it significantly correlated with both ACE and sIL-2R levels. This “suggests that the activity of MAIT cells reflects disease activity,” the researchers said. Further, the team also found that the levels of IL-18 — a known activator of MAIT cells in other diseases — were higher in people with sarcoidosis than in controls, suggesting that “IL-18 is an activator of MAIT cells in sarcoidosis patients.” The researchers then analyzed BALF samples of 14 sarcoidosis patients to investigate the role of MAIT cells in the lungs. The absolute number and proportion of MAIT cells were significantly higher in patients at pulmonary stage 2 or greater — where granulomas are present in the lungs — compared with those at pulmonary stage 0-1, in which granulomas are present in the lymph nodes. The levels of activated MAIT cells also were higher in BALF than in the blood of sarcoidosis patients, indicating that MAIT cells are especially high in inflammatory sites. Overall, the findings showed that “the proportion of MAIT cells in peripheral blood was lower but more activated in patients with sarcoidosis than in healthy controls,” and that the cells are “strongly activated in lungs of sarcoidosis patients,” the researchers said. Based on the results, the team suggested that “MAIT cells are a potential target for sarcoidosis treatment.” The post Subgroup of Active T-cells Linked to Worse Disease in Sarcoidosis, Study Reports appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  15. New research in piglets suggests that the immune systems of males and females respond differently to pre- and probiotics as early as in infancy. Link naar het originele artikel
  16. Despite skyrocketing healthcare costs, President Trump is committed to protecting the 30 million or so Americans with rare diseases and ensuring timely, affordable access to lifesaving treatments, the nation’s highest-ranking health official said. “We have to think about how our financing system can protect those with serious and rare illnesses. When successful therapies are developed, they can be extremely expensive, so we need to ensure that Americans who suffer from rare diseases have ways to finance their care,” said Alex Azar, secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The 2019 NORD Summit in Washington, D.C., featured U.S. Health & Human Services Secretary Alex Azar. (Photos by Larry Luxner) “In part, that means keeping the promise President Trump has made to Americans with pre-existing conditions: a guarantee we will maintain at the federal level,” he added. “That’s not changing. We want a system that works — and protects what works.” Azar spoke to more than 900 delegates attending the 2019 NORD Rare Diseases & Orphan Products Breakthrough Summit in Washington, D.C. The Oct. 21–22 event, organized by the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), also featured presentations by Norman E. “Ned” Sharpless, MD, acting commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and his predecessor, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD. “Medicare and private insurance have made it possible for Americans to receive the most cutting-edge treatments,” said Azar, the first U.S. cabinet secretary to address a NORD summit. “Securing longer, happier, healthier lives is the fundamental goal the president has for our healthcare system — especially for patients suffering from rare diseases.” He added: “President Trump has a particular vision for healthcare that puts you, the patient, at the center and treats you like a human being, and not like a number. Such a system will provide you with the affordability you need, the control you want, and the quality you deserve.” A new approach to rare diseases NORD, a coalition of 280 patient advocacy organizations, is a longtime supporter of the Orphan Drug Act of 1983. This controversial law gives pharmaceutical companies tax and other incentives to develop therapies for rare diseases — which, according to the FDA, are those affecting fewer than 200,000 Americans. Of the 7,000 or so known rare diseases, roughly 90% still lack FDA-approved treatments, and more than half of those affected are children. As secretary of HHS, Azar oversees a fiscal 2019 budget of $1.2 trillion. The agency administers 115 programs across its 11 operating divisions, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the FDA, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Health Resources and Services Administration. Azar addresses the 2019 NORD Summit in Washington, D.C. In his 17-minute speech, Azar cited sickle cell disease (SCD) as a prime example of Trump’s approach to the millions of people whose conditions are considered rare. “We believe we can make a meaningful impact quite soon on this terrible disease,” he said, noting that the illness plagues about 100,000 Americans — particularly blacks and Hispanics — and causes excruciating pain as well as infections, lung damage, blindness, depression, and heart and kidney failure. “While sickle cell disease has been neglected for far too long, today there are many, many reasons for hope,” Azar said. “In fact, it is one of the single most promising areas for biomedical research, and the Trump administration has made the disease a top priority. At HHS, we’ve set a goal of extending the lives of Americans with sickle cell disease by 10 years within 10 years.” To that end, Trump late last year signed into law a bipartisan bill that reauthorizes a current SCD prevention and treatment program for nearly $5 million each year over the next five years. The Sickle Cell Disease and Other Heritable Blood Disorders Research, Surveillance, Prevention and Treatment Act of 2018 had been co-sponsored by Sens. Cory Booker (D-New Jersey) and Tim Scott (R-South Carolina). Azar: ‘The cures are coming’ Azar, 52, assumed leadership of HHS in January 2018 following his Senate confirmation. Before that, he headed the U.S. division of Eli Lilly & Company from 2012 to 2017. A longtime lobbyist for the pharmaceutical industry, he noted that 40 therapies to help manage SCD-related pain are currently being tested in clinical trials. “Market failures have led some diseases to be neglected for far too long,” he said. “Government has a major role to play in helping to finance drugs for rare and neglected diseases. Companies have little incentive to develop a drug that may benefit only a small percentage of the population.” Banner at 2019 NORD Summit notes that 25-30 million Americans — nearly 1 in 10 people — have rare diseases. The NIH announced on Oct. 23 plans to invest at least $100 million over the next four years toward developing “affordable, gene-based cures” for both SCD and HIV. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will also put $100 million toward this goal. Yet that’s only part of the challenge, said Azar. Paying for all these new treatments could be a bigger battle — especially considering the $2.1 million price tag for the recently approved Novartis gene therapy Zolgensma for spinal muscular atrophy. “Gene therapies have typically carried unprecedented high prices, and the same will likely be true for a cure for sickle cell. Progress must prompt us to think about how we’re going to finance the delivery of these cures,” he said. “The cures are coming — thank God they are — but when they arrive, we’ve got to be ready to get them to patients who desperately need them,” Azar added. “All of the actors involved — HHS, private payers, innovators, legislators, and patient advocates — need to be thinking now about how to build a system together that can support access to these cures. “The whole point of a health insurance system like we have is to ensure that if you are struck by a serious illness — let alone one that is rare and highly unlikely — our system is there to care for you.” The post HHS Secretary Alex Azar Touts White House Efforts to Cure Rare Diseases appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  17. About 1.6 million people in the US alone currently have lifelong and incurable Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and 70,000 new cases are diagnosed in the USA each year. IBD patients suffer from pain, extreme discomfort, and many other symptoms caused by continuously relapsing and remitting inflammatory lesions in the layer of cells that lines the intestinal lumen (mucosa). The exact causes for IBD still are poorly understood, but it is clear that a misdirected immune system is at work, and that certain components of the microbial community in our gut, known as the intestinal microbiome, and environmental factors contribute to its destructive forces. Link naar het originele artikel
  18. New research in mice suggests that a leaky blood-brain barrier can accelerate brain aging, and that targeting inflammation can reverse some changes. Link naar het originele artikel
  19. Joachim

    Small Dietary Changes Can Make a Big Difference

    A few months ago, I enrolled in two online courses: a naturopath nutritional course and a master herbalist course. I hoped to gain knowledge about living a more holistic lifestyle. I’ve always believed that adopting a more healthy lifestyle can provide long-lasting benefits for anyone living with chronic health issues. I’ve managed to eat a balanced and healthy diet since I was in my late teens or early 20s. My aunt used to call me “salad boy” because I would get a huge salad every time we went out to dinner or get most of my meal from the salad bar. I love all vegetables. I made various changes to how I ate over the years as I learned more about food. My children adopted many of my dietary habits. There’s nothing worse than getting and staying sick, especially if food can help alleviate some of the problems associated with chronic illness. ‘Tis the season As healthy as my diet is, I occasionally give in to things that I usually enjoy in moderation. I also give in to things that I should avoid altogether. For example, I’m a big ice cream person. I have to eat a bowl or two before bedtime. I rationalize my guilty pleasure by telling my wife and kids that it helps me sleep better. They know I’m making excuses and laugh about it. Their laughter is priceless. A few weeks ago, my wife and I went to one of the warehouse clubs to do some shopping. In a moment of weakness, my primitive self convinced my logical self to purchase a pre-sliced marble and banana nut cake. I convinced myself that the cake would be better than ice cream, so I bought it. Over the next few days, I happily indulged in a slice of cake for breakfast with almond milk or tea. I also had a slice before bedtime with a glass of almond milk. It took a few days for me to realize that my body was unaccustomed to that amount of sugar and other highly processed ingredients. I could feel my body declining and growing lethargic. When you have pulmonary sarcoidosis, you become in tune with your breathing and breathing patterns. I noticed that my breathing was becoming labored. Additionally, all of the processed sugar was disrupting my sleep pattern. I also wasn’t taking into consideration the other kinds of sugars that I may have been consuming throughout the day. I told my wife to take the remaining slices of cake to work and give them to her co-workers. I failed the test but learned the lesson. Eat the rainbow During the holidays, everyone will more than likely fall off the health wagon. But as the saying goes, everything in moderation. This time of year, I usually treat myself to cognac and beer. This year, however, I think I’ll change things up and go with wines for their health benefits. My wife and I have already discussed our holiday menus. We agreed on making some changes to get all of us back on the right track. Following are some things to consider when it comes to healthy eating during the holidays: Phytonutrients: Plants contain plenty of natural chemicals called phytochemicals, which aid in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Foods that contain phytonutrients include fruits, vegetables, teas, legumes, nuts, and whole grains. The more colorful they are, the better. Antioxidants: Antioxidants may prevent or delay certain types of cell damage. Not getting enough antioxidants can cause “oxidative stress,” which can result in cell damage. Superfoods: Superfoods are nutritionally dense and good for your health. Superfoods are rich in antioxidants and include blueberries, salmon, kale, acai, and many other foods that are full of vitamins. Don’t forget to drink plenty of spring water, as opposed to purified water, and remember to get some exercise. I’ve made some significant changes to my diet that I believe have helped me overcome some of my health issues. I believe that sharing this information can help others. Changing your eating habits isn’t as bad as it may seem. It’s fun once you start feeling better, both physically and mentally, so why not give it a try? *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Small Dietary Changes Can Make a Big Difference appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  20. Earlier
  21. Scientists from 22 institutions, including UCLA, are recommending early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of severe chronic inflammation to reduce the risk of chronic disease and death worldwide. Link naar het originele artikel
  22. A research team led by biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found that a drug approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis can repair permeability defects in the gut's epithelium. Link naar het originele artikel
  23. Inflammation is a hallmark of many health conditions, but quantifying how the underlying biology of inflammation contributes to specific diseases has been difficult. For the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers and colleagues now report the development of a new technology to identify white blood cells called neutrophils that are primed to eject inflammatory DNA into the circulation via a process called NETosis. Link naar het originele artikel
  24. Joachim

    Bouncing Back Through Creativity

    It has been over a month since I first came down with the virus. I slept through the first week and a half, but was eventually able to get out of bed. I started with at least half of the day and progressed from there. The virus isn’t completely gone. Granted, I’m not as tired as I was or sleeping as much as I did. The congestion and sore throat are gone, and my appetite has returned. My brain doesn’t seem as foggy. However, “The Cough“ lingers and hits me upon waking and around dinnertime. This setback has been a challenge. I can’t remember the last time I had something this bad that lasted for so long. It is scary how quickly a minor illness can take a toll, and surprising how long it takes to recover. I tend to overthink when I have a health setback. Then I start to feel discouraged. Is this the beginning of another stage of sarcoidosis, or is my immune system in such bad shape that I can’t fight even a simple virus? Once I start thinking that way, I remind myself to do something I enjoy. The best cure is something that will lift my spirits while I recover. For me, it usually involves creative work. With the holidays approaching, I decided to knit. I wasn’t sure that I would be able to follow a pattern with my fuzzy brain, but I gave it a try. I made a scarf out of pretty, variegated blue and purple wool. The scarf kept me busy for a few hours every day for about a week. The pattern was relatively simple, but it still required my focus and attention. My scarf. (Photo by Kate Spencer) I was thrilled that I actually completed the piece. I felt fragile at the time, so it was a victory. I’m not sure who I’ll give the scarf to yet, but I am pleased with the way it turned out. Putting my creativity to use helped me through the virus. The icing on the cake is that I have something to show for all the time I spent under the weather. I enjoyed the project so much that I started knitting a second one! *** Note: Sarcoidosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sarcoidosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sarcoidosis. The post Bouncing Back Through Creativity appeared first on Sarcoidosis News. Link naar het originele artikel
  25. Joachim

    Voorstellen KarenLowie

    Het is mij nog niet duidelijk of ze bij jou ooit al eens een gerichte onderzoeken hebben gedaan naar Sarcoïdose. Heb je al eens op de volgende sites gekeken: http://sarcoidose.be/index.htm https://sarcoidose.nl/ Hier vindt je heel veel informatie over welke onderzoeken je allemaal krijgt, als men Sarcoïdose verdenkt. Wellicht kun je deze afstrepen tegen de onderzoeken die je al hebt gehad.
  26. New research suggests that certain immune markers in people's blood could help identify those at higher risk of disease and disease-related death. Link naar het originele artikel
  27. Karenlowie

    Voorstellen KarenLowie

    Nog niets bevestigd... ondertss is wel gebleken dat ik te weinig cortisol aanmaak...
  28. Joachim

    Voorstellen KarenLowie

    Ai vervelend zeg dat de arts nog niets gevonden heeft? Heb je om een second opinion gevraagd of is Sarcoïdose al aangetoond door je eigen arts inmiddels?
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